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Professional Photography in Stoke on Trent and Staffordshire
 
 
 
 
 
 
TELPEPHONE PAUL PICKARD 07720238997 EMAIL paulpickardfolio@yahoo.com
 
BUSINESS PROFILE PHOTOGRAPHY 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

Professional Photography in Stoke on Trent and Staffordshire

You might have the creative part down, but in order to launch and maintain a successful career as a professional photographer, it’s just as important to focus on the business side of your workflow. It might not be as fun or glamorous as the actual shooting, but it’s what will keep you going in the long-term.

A common misconception about photographers is that they spend most of their time behind a camera. But depending on their field, many devote a considerable chunk of their time to business and administration tasks like bookkeeping, invoicing, advertising, and social media marketing. In fact, this suggests that professional photographers spend as much as 18% of their time on running a business, as opposed to about 4% on photography—the rest goes to editing and communication.

Here are twelve quick business tips for professional photographers who are wanting to grow their business.

to become an expert in any field, you have to devote 10,000 hours to practicing your craft. Of course, this number is by no means hard and fast, but it’s still a useful rule of thumb.

The point is that innate talent by itself isn’t enough; you also have to work at it. This doesn’t necessarily mean you have to wait until you get all your hours in order to start a business; it just means that it takes a lot of time to reach true mastery.

Build an online community

It’s easier than ever to cultivate and expand your network. Set up a solid website and social media presence, and connect with like-minded editors and photographers. Pitch your projects widely, and reach out to artists you admire. Ask for advice, and let people know you’re interested in collaborating or apprenticing. The worst that can happen is no response. The best is the opportunity of a lifetime.

Know your brand

In a world where everyone is a photographer, it’s crucial to stand out. Understand what makes you unique, and learn how to communicate it clearly and succinctly to potential clientsOnce you start building that network, make sure to take full advantage of it. Use an old-fashioned Rolodex, set up a document or spreadsheet for all your contacts, or invest in dedicated software

Before launching a business, make sure you can cover all your costs (gear, studio, marketing materials, etc.) without going into debt. This seems obvious, but tracking your expenses and ensuring you have enough in the bank has to be part of your everyday routine and workflow. Keep up with your taxes, and remember that unexpected payments can hit you at any time. If possible, build up a nest egg to live off of during the slower months.

While client work or art exhibitions might take up the bulk of your time, try to set up some additional ways to earn on a regular basis. Your “side hustle” can be a guide or course for other photographers, or it could be an online print store for your followers. Maybe it’s selling your old gear.Innovate constantly

A solid sense of who you are and what you offer will form the foundation of your business, but a strong point of view and the ability to think on your feet aren’t mutually exclusive. You can stay true to your values and your perspective as an artist while also pushing yourself to try new things. Your work doesn’t stop once you’ve established yourself as a professional—in many ways, that’s just the beginning. Instead of sitting back and relying on your comfort zone, step outside the box and see what happens.

Pay it forward

When building your business, you’ll get a ton of help and guidance from more experienced photographers, so remember to lift up those who are less experienced than you are.

At the beginning of your career, the best thing you can do is to find a reliable mentor—someone who will be honest and candid with you throughout the process. When you’re more established, it’s time to look for someone to mentor yourself.

 
 

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